Has your recent ‘thanks, but no thanks’ letter got you down? When the jobseeking blues hit, it’s easy to want to give it all up. But we’re going to ask you to put that off for now. Instead, we’re going to look at why you’re not getting the job, and what you can do to change that. Here are 4 reasons why you're not getting hired.

Has your recent ‘thanks, but no thanks’ letter got you down? When the jobseeking blues hit, it’s easy to want to give it all up. But we’re going to ask you to put that off for now. Instead, we’re going to look at why you’re not getting the job, and what you can do to change that.

You’re not looking in the right places

Sometimes, employers hire directly from listings. More often than not, if they have other options, they will go for them. They want some sort of consensus to help them make judgements beyond their own reasoning. For instance, they will look at a credit control recruitment agency if they want someone working in credit. They will even be more likely to fast-track anyone who has a personal referral to their name. Besides applying with the right experience and the right approach, you need to apply through the right channels.

You’re not doing your research

If you get an interview, then it’s fair to say that you’re in the same position of everyone else who has gotten that far, regardless of what method they used to get that way. But what do other interviewees have you seem to be lacking? One of the most impressive traits that employers agree on is the amount of preparation and research done before the interview. Not just practicing your answers, but finding out more about the business and crafting answers that fit them specifically. Coming in with questions about how you can fit their values and needs, and demonstrating some knowledge of those, shows you’re already dedicated to being the exact person for the job.

You could pay more attention to etiquette

We’re not going to assume that you have an attitude or that you’re a bit scatter-brained. There are a few reasons you might not have used the right etiquette, but none of them are good. For instance, if you’re rude to the receptionist, you might as well insult the interviewer. They’re going to hear about it anyway. If you’re late or if you forget to bring something that the interviewer requested, it shows that you don’t take orders well and that you don’t treat your work with the proper respect. Take care to inspect your etiquette a little better.

You’re relying too much on employers

If you have a skill that you know you can sell, perhaps you should think about doing it another besides applying for jobs. Instead, why not have those same businesses coming to you instead? Frame yourself as a professional, invest in some branding and presence, then start selling your service as your own business. If you get it right, you’re no longer the seller on a buyer’s market. You have to learn how to cope with the challenges of running a business, but you might be more suited to that.

With a little rethinking, you might find your jobless days behind you before long. Take a look at the channels you use to apply, the amount of prep work you do and even what kind of impression you make. It could do wonders for your chances.